English Blog – English for Kerala Syllabus

Test your use of ‘Articles’

Fill the blanks with the suitable article:
1. I only want ……….. little sugar in my tea please.
     (a, the, such)
2. In …………… end we decided not to go to the cinema nut to watch television. (the, this, an)
3. It is important sometimes to stop and look around you at all the wonderful things ………… (nature, in nature , in the nature)
4. It is …….. book that I have ever read. 
    (funniest, a funniest , the funniest)
5. I want to go to the cinema to see a film about ……….and the French. (France , a France , the France)
6. Can anyone give me ………….. please because I have just fallen over. (hand, a hand , the hand)
7. The interesting thing about ……… is all the roads that they built in Britain. (Romans, a Romans , the Romans)
8. She always said that when she grew up she wanted to be …….    ( doctor, a doctor, the doctor)
9. I have left my book in ………. and I would like you to get it for me. (kitchen, a kitchen, the kitchen)
10. Are you studying foreign languages at school, like ……… (French, a French, the French)
Courtesy to ‘Test Your English’
Compiled by Rajeev Joseph, Blog Admin

List of English words that are often mispronounced by Malayalees

Thomas
NJ, USA

Hi,



   I
came across your site today. It interests me that this is a site that
helps to improve English education in schools. I have already
compiled a list of English words that are often mispronounced by
Malayalees. They are pronounced so, since students are taught that
way in the average schools of Kerala.

List of English words that are often mispronounced by Malayalees
kangaroo
(the worst offended word, Malayalees/Indians pronounce as “kanGAROO”
instead of “KANgroo”)
All
words that end is “-ers”(pronounced as “-ezhs”
instead of “-es”)

mixed,
fixed (pronounced as ‘miksed’, ‘fiksed’ instead of ‘miksd’,
‘fiksd’)

bear, pear, wear (pronounced as ‘biyar’, ‘piyar’,
‘wiyer’ instead of ‘beye’, ‘peye’, ‘weye’)

Queen
(prounounced as “kyuun” instead of “kween”)

form
(pronounced as ‘farum’ instead of “fom”)

volume
(books) (pronounced as “vaalyam’ instead of “volyum”)

biennale
(pronounced as “binale” instead of “bienale”)

place
names – Ohio, Seattle, Utah (pronounced as “ohiyo, seetl, ootha”
instead of “ohayo, siyatl, yuta”)

turtle (pronounced as
‘turrrtil’ instead of “tutl” )Mascot Hotel (pronounced as “muskut HOtel” instead of “MAScot hoTEL”)
 

heart (pronounced
as ‘harrt’ instead of “haat”)

auto
(pronounced as “aaatto” instead of “otto”)

bass
(pronounced as ‘baas’ instead of “beis”)

twitter
(speaker) (pronounced as “tyooter” instead of “twiter”)

birthday
(pronounced as “birthaday” instead of “buthdei”)

garage
(pronounced as “garej” instead of “gaRAZH/gaRAJ”)

chassis
(pronounced as “chasis” instead of “shasi”)

pizza
(pronounced as “pisa” instead of “pitza”)

our
(pronounced as “avar” instead of “aue”)
flour
(pronounced as “flower” instead of “flaue”)
alarm
(pronounced as “alarum” instead of “alaam”)
film
(pronounced as “filim” instead of ‘film’)
little
(pronounced as “littil” instead of ‘litl’)
divorce
(pronounced as “daiverse” instead of “divors”)
Tortoise
(pronounced as ‘tortois’ instead of “totis” )
November
(pronuonced as “NOVember” instead of “noVEMber”)
one
(pronounced as “onn” instead of “wun”)
beer
(pronounced as “biiir” instead of “biye”)
February
(pronounced as “fibruari” instead of “februari”)





Thanks,



Thomas,



NJ,
USA

[NB: If you know more such words please comment so
that we can add to this list – Blog Admin]

A collection of the most common 185 verbs and their V2, V3 and V4

          Verbs are an
essential
part in forming sentences. Knowing the four forms of the verb and
their meanings are inevitable in English language learning. That’s
why today’s post is a collection of the most common 185 verbs and their
V2, V3 and V4. The Malayalam meanings of V1 and V2 are also given. I
have proof read it only once. If you find any mistakes please let me
know via. comments or
rajeevjosephkk@gmail.com.
Also please let me know if you think some more verbs should have been a part of
this collection. 
        Whatever be the post it is comments that encourage
me or others to do more. So please let us know your feelings.  
Click here to download

by Rajeev Joseph

Tips for Writing Informal Letters

        Here are some tips for writing Informal letters. These tips were send to us by Mr. Ram Das Vallikkattil, H.S.A. English, National High School, Kolathoor, Malappuram.

Phrasal Verbs and 101 examples of Onomatopoeia

           The following is a list of ‘Phrasal Verbs’ and ‘101 examples of onomatopoeia’ collected from the internet and sent to the blog by Sri. Ram Das Vallikkaattil.

Phrasal Verb

            A phrasal verb is a verb followed by a preposition or an adverb;
the combination creates a

meaning different from the original verb alone. The phrasal verb list here contains a phrasal verb, its  meaning and an example sentence in one row which will really be useful for the teachers and students of High School and Higher Secondary classes.

Click here to DOWNLOAD phrasal verbs

 Onomatopoeia

         Onomatopoeia is a word that imitates or suggests the source of the sound that it describes. Onomatopœia (as an uncountable noun)
refers to the property of such words. Common occurrences of
onomatopœias include animal noises, such as “meow” or “roar”.

Sri. Ram Das Vallikkaattil
H.S.A.
English
National
High School,
Kolathoor,Malappuram

By Rajeev Joseph
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Ph.: 98477 38356
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